August 2, 2016

Bright 'Evening Star' seen from Mars is Earth

Earth seen from MarsEarth seen from MarsEarth and Moon seen from MarsEarth and Moon seen from Mars

This view of the twilight sky and Martian horizon taken by NASA's Curiosity Mars rover includes Earth as the brightest point of light in the night sky. Earth is a little left of center in the image, and our moon is just below Earth.

Researchers used the left eye camera of Curiosity's Mast Camera (Mastcam) to capture this scene about 80 minutes after sunset on the 529th Martian day, or sol, of the rover's work on Mars (Januar 31, 2014). The image has been processed to remove effects of cosmic rays.

A human observer with normal vision, if standing on Mars, could easily see Earth and the Moon as two distinct, bright "evening stars."

The distance between Earth and Mars when Curiosity took the photo was about 99 million miles (160 million kilometers).

Image Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS/TAMU
Explanation from: http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA17936

4 comments:

  1. Wow, what a shine!
    How come the earth's so bright that it could be mistaken for a star from Mars?

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wow, what a shine!
    How come the earth's so bright that it could be mistaken for a star from Mars?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I have stood on the surface of Mars
    and seen, high in the sky, at sunset
    a tiny star, bright but small
    reminding me, in all its pale blue fragility
    of the smallness of Man.
    We are dreamers, you and I,
    fellow travellers, for a while
    puzzling out, musingly,
    the greatest quest ever conceived.
    I love Life, and the gift
    given to us, short-lived creatures,
    to ponder the vast Universe.
    Never mourn the passing of our lives
    celebrate that it happened.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Why are there no other stars visible?

    ReplyDelete