July 24, 2017

SN 1987a in the Large Magellanic Cloud

SN 1987a in the Large Magellanic Cloud

Glittering stars and wisps of gas create a breathtaking backdrop for the self-destruction of a massive star, called supernova 1987A, in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a nearby galaxy. Astronomers in the Southern hemisphere witnessed the brilliant explosion of this star on February 23, 1987.

Shown in this NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, the supernova remnant, surrounded by inner and outer rings of material, is set in a forest of ethereal, diffuse clouds of gas. This three-color image is composed of several pictures of the supernova and its neighboring region taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 in September 1994, Feb. 1996 and July 1997.

Image Credit: Hubble Heritage Team (AURA/STScI/NASA/ESA)
Explanation from: https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/opo9904a/

1 comment:

  1. DANGEROUSLY BEAUTIFUL. IF I HAD THE BODY TO TRAVEL THROUGH SPACE & TIME, I WOULD. NOTHING LIKE BEING RIGHT THERE, LIKE A FLY ON THE WALL. IF ONLY. WHO DOESN'T DREAM OF FLYING TO THE STARS AND BEYOND? TOO BAD. AT LEAST WITH YOUR POSTS OF THE VAST UNIVERSE, I CAN STILL DREAM. THANK YOU FOR THAT.

    ReplyDelete